Self Care in the Digital Age


Woman looking to plug into a tree with one of three plugs: Soul, Mind, Body

Most of our devices work 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week. Email apps sends us notifications round the clock to let us know that someone is trying to reach us. We have come a long way from the days when we were reliant on the natural cycles of light and dark to determine when to rise and when to sleep — digital devices are just the latest development in a process where we began to shape our environment and our routines with technology.

But devices that are 24/7 can suck us into to trying to do the same. In order to not respond to the newest notification on my phone I need to actively make a choice: do I ignore it? turn off notifications? set them up with a schedule to leave me alone at certain time? or just look at my phone to see who it is?
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Please Send My Cat Home: What Our Health Dept. Doesn’t Want You to Know


Black cat on table, looking at camera.

Bear, on his 15th birthday, one month before his death.

I feel compelled to post this, even though it’s not part of the typical focus of my blog, because the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is trying to keep you–anyone–from reading it. Silencing people’s voices is a behavior I actively challenge, so I feel a need to make a record, here, that can’t be silenced. To my loyal readers: I promise this won’t be a focus of many, many posts. And, as always, feel free to not read anything that doesn’t interest you.

I left a letter/appeal to the NYSDOH on their Facebook Page on Thursday, February 27th; by Friday the 28th they had evidently received enough separate posts, as well as comments on my entry, that the NYSDOH staff turned off their “Posts by Others” pane (the one that allows you to see what people other than NYSDOH staff have posted).

What doesn’t the NYSDOH want you to know about?

Warning-This could be triggering to animal lovers: Continue reading

Virtual World Avatars Feed Children in Kenya


Feed A Smile stage at Lavender Field in Second Life

Feed A Smile stage at Lavender Field in Second Life

A German woman who declares herself “computer challenged”  is now raising money to feed children in Kenya via live music concerts in Second Life. Musicians play for free and donate their tips to the cause. Second Life residents who attend the concerts also provide additional donations.  A 100 Linden donation (the Second Life currency, equivalent to about 30 cents U.S. currency) provides a warm lunch for a child. The organization, Live and Learn in Kenya (LLK), has been using Second Life as a fundraising venue for their “Feed a Smile” program since 2010.

This inspiring 5 minute video illustrates some cool concepts: Continue reading

The Liebster Award


liebster2I just learned that this blog has received the Liebster Award– Thanks to thrutheseeyes1 for nominating me. Her blog, The Direction Not the Destination is a wonderful blend of her personal and professional reflections on life and her work as a social worker–I recommend that you check it out!

Of course, the first thing I did upon being notified of this award was to Google “Liebster Award.” I discovered that the main purpose of the award is to discover and recognize new blogs. A wonderful summary of the award and it’s iterations can be found in this comprehensive post by Lorraine Reguly.

Here are the rules to the Liebster Award:

  • Thank your Liebster Blog Award presenter on your blog and link back to the blogger who presented this award to you.
  • Answer the 10 questions from the nominator
  • Nominate 10 blogs and create 10 questions for your nominees.

My task now is to answer the 10 questions put to me in the nomination, nominate 10 blogs for this award, and then ask the 10 questions I would like to have my nominees answer if they accept the award. Continue reading

Toddlers May Learn More From Touch Screens Than Educational TV


Toddler looking at touchscreenI came across this story last month and it seemed appropriate to highlight here. It’s really not that surprising a finding, because watching TV is essential a passive activity and interacting with an electronic touch screen device is active. But for some reason, many of us tend to throw all “screen” related activities in the same mental bucket, so a study like this reminds us that screens can involve very different activities. Continue reading